odoriferante:

Sisters.

By Avan Lava.

Puerto Rico!

beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 
beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 
beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 
beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 
beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 
beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong
With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.
Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 

beckie0:

ridingwithstrangers:

Architectural Density in Hong Kong

With seven million people, Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated places in the world. However, plain numbers never tell the full story. In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the jaw-dropping urban landscapes of Hong Kong. He rids his photographs of any context, removing any sky or horizon line from the frame and flattening the space until it becomes a relentless abstraction of urban expansion, with no escape for the viewer’s eye. Infinite and haunting.

Editor’s Note: Co-signed.

This terrifies me. 

collectivehistory:

A woman being tattooed, early 1900s (via Imgur) 

collectivehistory:

A woman being tattooed, early 1900s (via Imgur

livelymorgue:

Nov. 5, 1922: Lulu McGrath is greeted by a diver in “Wonders of the Sea,” filmed off the Bahamas during the early days of underwater motion pictures. A report the following spring on a project by J.E. Williamson, the film’s director, related the perils of camera work at the time: “Not so very long ago, an intrepid photographer, when attempting to get a picture from an airplane of the crater of Vesuvius, just saved himself from falling into the seething, angry lava. This same cameraman, who is employed by Fox News, had another narrow escape from death in an airplane a few weeks ago. But he is inoculated with the spirit of adventure and keeps going.” Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Nov. 5, 1922: Lulu McGrath is greeted by a diver in “Wonders of the Sea,” filmed off the Bahamas during the early days of underwater motion pictures. A report the following spring on a project by J.E. Williamson, the film’s director, related the perils of camera work at the time: “Not so very long ago, an intrepid photographer, when attempting to get a picture from an airplane of the crater of Vesuvius, just saved himself from falling into the seething, angry lava. This same cameraman, who is employed by Fox News, had another narrow escape from death in an airplane a few weeks ago. But he is inoculated with the spirit of adventure and keeps going.” Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Nov. 5, 1922: Lulu McGrath is greeted by a diver in “Wonders of the Sea,” filmed off the Bahamas during the early days of underwater motion pictures. A report the following spring on a project by J.E. Williamson, the film’s director, related the perils of camera work at the time: “Not so very long ago, an intrepid photographer, when attempting to get a picture from an airplane of the crater of Vesuvius, just saved himself from falling into the seething, angry lava. This same cameraman, who is employed by Fox News, had another narrow escape from death in an airplane a few weeks ago. But he is inoculated with the spirit of adventure and keeps going.” Photo: The New York Times

tessaviolet:

mamadivaa:

mamadivaa:

THIS IS MY MOST FAVORITE POST ON TUMBLR EVER AND I WANT MY CAT TO BE A GIANT SO THAT I COULD LAY ON HIM AND BOTHER HIM AND RIDE HIM AROUND MY HOUSE.

I will reblog this every time i see it.

My cat would eat me if I were that size.

tessaviolet:

mamadivaa:

mamadivaa:

THIS IS MY MOST FAVORITE POST ON TUMBLR EVER AND I WANT MY CAT TO BE A GIANT SO THAT I COULD LAY ON HIM AND BOTHER HIM AND RIDE HIM AROUND MY HOUSE.

I will reblog this every time i see it.

My cat would eat me if I were that size.

(Source: oliviaxdd)

johnnybradshaw:

Daft Punk for Saint Laurent Paris

johnnybradshaw:

Daft Punk for Saint Laurent Paris

(Source: who-is-ryan)